Zindagi Hik Natak : Sindhi Films Back in Action


Sindhi cinema may seem like an alien industry, but it does in fact exist. Believe it or not, there has even been a remake of the legendary Sholay in Sindhi. However, more recently the virtually dying industry has been challenged by native filmmakers who believe that there is some ray of hope for Sindhi movies and recognizes a keen market globally. Such is the thinking of Kamal Raghani, who besides being the promoter to the latest Sindhi film, Zindagi Hik Natak, is also the son of producer-director of the film. Kamal possesses a background in filmmaking and his short film, 5×1=5, was chosen to be screened at The Berlin Film Festival. Zindagi Hik Natak: The Saga of a Sindhi Actor, is the latest film to come out of his family’s production house.
The film follows the life of a stage artist whose struggle and love for theater brings him to a crossroads where he must choose between his family and passion for acting. He chooses the latter which he realizes later was nothing short of a disastrous decision. It is only when his family leaves him to fulfill his dream, that he recognizes the need for their support. He eventually wins back the love of his family and credibility to his name but not after a series of events that changes his outlook on life forever. Gopal Raghani, who dually adorns the director and producers cap for this one, claims that while he heralds a strong interest in developing films and television series’ for Sindhis, he eventually knew he would direct a Sindhi film too. Additionally, immediately after the first promo released, he received positive feedback which only furthered his drive to revive the industry, “One viewer after watching a promo of the film said to me, ‘Amazing! This is the first time I have seen a Sindhi film promo,’ it touched my heart.” He was backed up by lead actress Mayuri Raghani who took on the role of the onscreen actor’s wife to assist the director in his mission. “It feels miserable to know that Sindhi community itself is losing love for their language. Even Sindhi artists, who try to spread the message to save Sindhi heritage through their plays and films, they themselves don’t speak in Sindhi during rehearsals,” she states.

by Roshni Mulchandani

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